Thursday, May 01, 2008

U.S. Hispanic Population Surpasses 45 Million

1 May 2008 05:01 Africa/Lagos


U.S. Hispanic Population Surpasses 45 Million

Now 15 Percent of Total

WASHINGTON, May 1 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The following was released today by the U.S. Census Bureau:


The nation's Hispanic population increased 1.4 million to reach 45.5 million on July 1, 2007, or 15.1 percent of the estimated total U.S. population of 301.6 million.


National and state estimates by race, Hispanic origin, sex and age released today by the U.S. Census Bureau also show that the Hispanic population exceeded 500,000 in 16 states.


Hispanics remained the largest minority group, with blacks (single race or multiracial) second at 40.7 million in 2007. The black population exceeded 500,000 in 20 states. Blacks were the largest minority group in 24 states, compared with 20 states in which Hispanics were the largest minority group.


Blacks were followed by Asians, who totaled 15.2 million; American Indians and Alaska Natives, who totaled 4.5 million; and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders, with 1 million. The population of whites (single race and not of Hispanic origin) totaled 199.1 million (See Table 1: http://www.census.gov/dcmd/www/embargo/cb08-67table1.xls).


With a 3.3 percent increase between July 1, 2006, and July 1, 2007, Hispanics were the fastest-growing minority group. Asians were the second fastest-growing minority group, with a 2.9 percent population increase during the period. The white population grew by 0.3 percent during the one-year period.


Overall, the nation's minority population reached 102.5 million in 2007 -- 34 percent of the total. California had a minority population of 20.9 million -- 20 percent of the nation's total, Texas had a minority population of 12.5 million -- 12 percent of the U.S. total.


Four states and the District of Columbia were "majority-minority" (i.e., more than 50 percent of their population is made up of people other than single-race non-Hispanic whites). Hawaii led the nation with a population that was 75 percent minority in 2007, followed by the District of Columbia (68 percent), New Mexico (58 percent), California (57 percent) and Texas (52 percent). Next in line, though not majority-minority, were Nevada, Maryland and Georgia, each with a minority population of 42 percent (See Table 2: http://www.census.gov/dcmd/www/embargo/cb08-67table1.xls).


Highlights for the various groups:
Hispanics
-- California (13.2 million) had the largest Hispanic population of any
state as of July 1, 2007, followed by Texas (8.6 million) and Florida
(3.8 million). Texas had the largest numerical increase between 2006
and 2007 (308,000), followed by California (268,000) and Florida
(131,000). In New Mexico, Hispanics comprised the highest proportion
of the total population (44 percent), with California and Texas (36
percent each) next in line.

-- The Hispanic population in 2007 had a median age of 27.6, compared
with the population as a whole at 36.6. Almost 34 percent of the
Hispanic population was younger than 18, compared with 25 percent of
the total population.

Blacks
-- The black population increased by 1.3 percent, or 540,000, between
2006 and 2007.

-- New York had the largest black population in 2007 (3.5 million),
followed by Florida and Texas (3 million each). Georgia had the
largest numerical increase between 2006 and 2007 (84,000), with Texas
(62,000) and Florida (48,000) next. In the District of Columbia, the
black population comprised the highest percentage (56 percent);
Mississippi (38 percent) and Louisiana (32 percent) were next.

-- The single-race black population in 2007 had a median age of 31.1,
compared with the population as a whole at 36.6. About 31 percent of
the black population was younger than 18, compared with 25 percent of
the total population.



Asians
-- The Asian population rose by 2.9 percent, or 434,000, between 2006 and
2007.

-- California (5 million) had the largest Asian population on July 1,
2007, as well as the largest numerical increase during the 2006 to
2007 period (106,000). New York (1.4 million) and Texas (915,000)
followed in population. Texas (44,000) and New York (33,000) followed
in numerical increase. In Hawaii, Asians made up the highest
proportion of the total population (55 percent), with California (14
percent), and New Jersey and Washington (8 percent each) next.

-- The single-race Asian population in 2007 had a median age of 35.4,
compared with the population as a whole at 36.6.

-- Asians were the largest minority group in Hawaii and Vermont.

American Indians and Alaska Natives
-- The American Indian and Alaska Native population rose by 1 percent or
45,000, from 2006 to 2007.

-- California (689,000) had the largest population of American Indians
and Alaska Natives on July 1, 2007, with Oklahoma (394,000) and
Arizona (335,000) next. Texas had the largest numerical increase
(8,300) since July 1, 2006, followed by Arizona (4,900) and Florida
(2,800). In Alaska, American Indians and Alaska Natives made up the
highest proportion of the total population (18 percent), with Oklahoma
(11 percent) and New Mexico (10 percent) next.

-- The single-race American Indian and Alaska Native population in 2007
had a median age of 30.3, compared with the population as a whole at
36.6. About 27 percent of the American Indian and Alaska Native
population was younger than 18, compared with 25 percent of the total
population.

-- American Indians and Alaska Natives were the largest minority group in
Alaska, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma and South Dakota.

Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders
-- The Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population rose by 1.6
percent, or 16,000, from 2006 to 2007.


-- Hawaii had the largest population (269,000), followed by California
(262,000) and Washington (50,000). California had the largest
numerical increase (2,900) of people of this group, with Texas (2,500)
and Florida (1,100) next. In Hawaii, Native Hawaiians and Other
Pacific Islanders comprised the largest proportion (21 percent) of the
total population, followed by Utah (1 percent) and Alaska (0.9
percent).

-- The single-race Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population
in 2007 had a median age of 30.2, compared with the population as a
whole at 36.6. About 29 percent of the Native Hawaiian and Other
Pacific Islander population was younger than 18, compared with 25
percent of the total population.

Whites

-- The non-Hispanic, single-race white population of 199.1 million
represented 66 percent of the total population.

-- California, New York and Texas had the largest population of this
group (15.6 million, 11.6 million and 11.4 million, respectively), but
Texas experienced the largest numerical increase (95,000), followed by
North Carolina (92,000) and Georgia (57,000). Maine (96 percent) had
the highest proportion of whites, followed by Vermont (95 percent) and
West Virginia (94 percent).

-- The white population in 2007 was older than the population as a whole:
The respective median ages were 40.8 and 36.6. About 21 percent of the
population of this group was younger than 18, compared with 25 percent
of the total population.

Also released today were tabulations by age:
-- Thirteen percent of the total population, 37.9 million people, was 65
and older in 2007.

-- The number of people 85 and older reached 5.5 million, or 2 percent of
the population.

-- In 2007, working-age adults (18 to 64) totaled 189.8 million, which
was 63 percent of the population.

-- The number of preschoolers (younger than 5) was estimated at 20.7
million.

-- The number of children 5 to 13 was 36 million, with children 14 to 17
numbering 17.2 million.


-- States with the highest percentages of older people (65 and older)
included Florida (17 percent), West Virginia (15.5 percent) and
Pennsylvania (15.2 percent). States with the lowest percentages were
Alaska (7 percent), Utah (8.8 percent) and Georgia (9.9 percent).

-- States with the highest percentages of preschoolers included Utah (9.7
percent), Texas (8.3 percent) and Idaho (7.9 percent). States with the
lowest percentages were Vermont (5.2 percent), Maine (5.4 percent) and
New Hampshire (5.7 percent).



Unless otherwise specified, the data refer to the population who reported a race alone or in combination with one or more other races. The detailed tables show data for both this group and those who reported a single race only. Censuses and surveys permit respondents to select more than one race; consequently, people may be one race or a combination of races. Hispanics may be any race.


The federal government treats Hispanic origin and race as separate and distinct concepts. In surveys and censuses, separate questions are asked on Hispanic origin and race. The question on Hispanic origin asks respondents if they are Spanish, Hispanic or Latino. Starting with Census 2000, the question on race asked respondents to report the race or races they consider themselves to be. Thus, Hispanics may be of any race.


(See U.S. Census Bureau Guidance on the Presentation and Comparison of Race and Hispanic Origin Data: http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/compraceho.html.)


These data are based on estimates of U.S. population for July 1, 2007. The Census Bureau estimates population change from the most recent decennial census (Census 2000) using annual data on births, deaths and international migration. More detailed information on the methodology used to produce these estimates can be found at http://www.census.gov/popest/topics/methodology/.


Editor's note: The embargoed data can be accessed at


http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/embargoed_releas es/index.html.


After the release time, go to http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.php

Robert Bernstein
Public Information Office
301-763-3030/3762 (fax)
301-457-1037 (TDD)
e-mail: pio@census.gov



Broadcast release: http://www.census.gov/dcmd/www/embargo/cb08-67broadcast.pdf


Detailed tables: http://www.census.gov/dcmd/www/embargo/popest


State contacts: http://www.census.gov/population/www/coop/contacts.html


Source: U.S. Census Bureau

CONTACT: Robert Bernstein, Public Information Office of the U.S. Census
Bureau, +1-301-763-3030, +1-301-763-3762 (fax), +1-301-457-1037 (TDD),
pio@census.gov


Web Site: U.S. Census Bureau

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